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The Almost Christian by George Whitefield

The Almost Christian, by the Rev. George Whitefield, was published in 1738. As you can see above, this pamphlet has a cover page.  The sermon speaks of and to the lukewarm pretenders and betrayers of the Christian faith.

 

This sermon is based on ACTS xxvi.28.

Almost thou persuades me to be a Christian.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whitefield organizes his exposition into 4 major sections:

  1. Defining the “Almost Christian”
  2. The reasons for their prevalence
  3. The spiritual ineffectualness of lukewarm Christianity
  4. An exhortation for the striving towards altogether Christianity. We could only hope the inward working of God’s Spirit would convict such individuals as they read or listen to this historical piece.

This 28-page stab-bound pamphlet is another fine example of a George Whitefield sermon that helped spur on our 1st Great Awakening. It measures about 4 5/8 inches wide by about 6 inches tall. You may purchase this sermon/pamphlet for $9.95 from on online Etsy Store at the following link:  Purchase Here

John Wesley also wrote a pamphlet by this same title, The Almost Christian. I make replicas of Wesley’s 2nd edition of this pamphlet dated 1743. I would strongly recommend that you purchase and read these pamphlets together. Wesley’s can be purchased for $9.95 from our Etsy Store at the following link: Purchase Here

It was not uncommon for Wesley and Whitefield to argue back and forth in print about their differences in theological. However, they became great friends during their days as students at Oxford and remained so until death.

Divine Service at Fort Frederick, Maryland June 15th 2018

Jim Rogers took these photos while Tad Miller was leading the Divine Service at Fort Frederick, Maryland during the Pontiac Rebellion reenactment on Sunday morning, July 15th, 2018.  Tad is using his 1734 Book of Common Prayer to lead this service.  I would like to encourage all that attend reenacting events to take similar photos during Divine Service and share them with me.  Videos would be even better.

18th Century Chaplains’ Jobs

“Many…Chaplain’s…normal post during and after a battle was with the wounded.  ‘My station in time of action I knew to be among the surgeons’ – John Gano (Headly, 255). Ebenezer David died of sickness while working at a Hospital on March 19, 1778. Thompson notes that many chaplains served also as surgeons…and in fact, Robert Blackwell, James Sproat, David Jones and David Avery had each been trained as professional medical men as well as Clergy before joining the Army. Avery brought his own medical chest because of the lack of supplies in the Army”.

Source:  Source

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