Month: February 2018

“The Necessity of Keeping the Soul” by Gilbert Tennent

“The Necessity of keeping the Soul”, like many other period sermons was published and made available to those who did not originally hear this sermon preached; even us today. It was preached on December 23rd, 1744 in Philadelphia where it was printed by William Bradford at the Sign of the Bible on Second-Street.  It is intended both to exhort Christians and warn non-Christians. The original 24 page imprint measures 4 1/2” x 6 1/2”. It follows all the printing conventions of the day: Caslon-style type, excessive capitalization of nouns, using italics to quote Bible verses, and using “catchwords” (which is a preview the word or syllable at the bottom on a page that will be the first word/syllable on the following page).  You can purchase this pamphlet on my Etsy page at the following link:  Purchase Here

Gilbert Tennent & Ben Franklin “On the Dangers of an Unconverted Ministry”, 1740

Gilbert Tennent (1703-1764), an Irish-born Presbyterian minister, burst on the national scene in 1740, with his sermon entitled, “On the Dangers of an Unconverted Ministry”.  This sermon was printed in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin.  In that sermon, Tennent suggested that pastors who stood in opposition to the current revival may be unconverted. That pamphlet created quite a controversy throughout the Colonies.  The original 24 page imprint measures 4 1/2” x 6 1/2”. It follows all the printing conventions of the day: Caslon-style type, excessive capitalization of nouns, using italics to quote Bible verses, and using “catchwords” (which is a preview the word or syllable at the bottom on a page that will be the first word/syllable on the following page).  You may purchase this pamphlet/sermon for yourself or a friend from my Etsy Shop at the following link:  Purchase Here

Psalm 28:7 on Powder Horns

These two powder horns have Psalms 28:7 inscribed on them.

“The Lord is my Strength & my Shield My heart trust in him”

Along with the photo of these two powder horns, I have also posted this same Psalm from several different period sources.

Psalm 28:7 from the original 1720 Psalms reads a little differently:  “He is my shield and fortitude, my buckler in distress”.  You can find this 1720 Psalms toward the back of my pocket size 1733 New Testament.  Check out this New Testament at the following link: Click Here

The 1715 Psalms reads:  “The Lord is my strength and my shield, my heart trusted in him, and I am helped:  therefore my heart greatly rejoyceth, and with my song will I praise him.”  You can find this Psalms in my 1715 Old Testament and in the back of our full size 1733 New Testaments. Check out this Bible at the following link: Click Here

In my replica of our 1734 Book of Common Prayer Psalm 28:7 reads something entirely different, so we can ignore that.  However, Psalm 28:8 reads:  “The Lord is my strength, and my shield, my heart hath trusted in him, and I am helped:  therefore my heart danceth for joy, and in my song will I praise him.”  Maybe my eyes are crooked.  Check out my replica of our Book of Common Prayer at the following link:  Click Here

My replica of the 1640 Bay Psalm Book reads:  “God is my strength, my shield, in him my heart did trust, & helpt I was:  Therefore my heart will gladnes shew, and with my song I’le him confesse.”  The title page of this book is “The Whole Booke of Psalmes…”, but it is now know as the Bay Psalm Book.  Check out my replica of this Psalm book at the following link:  Click Here

My replica of our John Playford’s 1697 Psalms reads:    “He is my shield and fortitude, my buckler in distress:  My hope, my help, my heart’s relief, my song shall him confess.”  Please take a look at my replica of our original 1697 John Playford Psalms & Hymns book at the following link:  Click Here

I hope that this gives you several more period options to inscribe on your next horn project.  I bet you had no idea that I make replicas of all these Psalm books. ~ James

Isaac Watts 1767 Hymnal

Watch this 5 minute YouTube video about Isaac Watts and his hymns.  I am working on three of his 1767 Hymnals.  My original hymnal was printed in Boston in 1767.  When I finish these in a few weeks, you will be able to purchase them for $145 each from my Etsy Store at the following link:  Click Here  You may also pre-order a copy.

 

“The Marks of the New Birth” by George Whitefield, 1739

I just finished cleaning up and printing the first replica of George Whitefield’s pamphlet/sermon, “The Marks of the New Birth”, dated 1739.  This is a 24 page pamphlet that measures 4 1/2 inches wide by 6 1/2 inches tall.  The last five pages of this pamphlet contain a section entitled, “A Prayer for one desiring to be awakened to an Experience of the New Birth” and then a shorter one titled, “A Prayer for one newly awakened to a Sense of the Divine Life”.  I read this pamphlet this morning and it is my most favorite pamphlet that I currently make.  You will want to read and pass these out to your reenactor friends.  Substantial volume discounts are available for this and any other pamphlet that I make.  Just ask.  You can purchase this pamphlet for $9.95 from my Etsy page at the following link.  Purchase Here

Patrick Henry & the Bible

I have been making this particular 1733 Bible for 7 years now.  Patrick Henry said: “The Bible is a book worth more than all the other books that were ever printed.”  The Bible’s significant—not because it’s talking about itself, but because it’s pointing beyond itself. . .We’re talking about the Bible itself—not a tradition, a church or a denomination. It’s about a book! A wide range of people have participated in the survival of this Book—and have had their lives changed by it! Some have lost their lives to assure its continuing!  More than just a transmission of a narrative or an oral history—a book with its own story to tell. What an exciting adventure for you and me—to bring a greater awareness to the world of this Book—to invite all people to engage with the Bible!  Take a look at how I hand bind this Bible at the following link:  Click Here

Source:  The Museum of the Bible

Tooling a 1640 Bay Psalm Book

When the Massachusetts Bay Colony was charted in 1628, the Reverend Jose Glover of Surrey subscribed for £50 of its capital stock. Later, Glover raised funds and acquired a printing press for the new colony. After resigning from his pulpit, Glover secured passage for his family and for the family of his indentured servant Stephen Daye. In addition to his family, servants, and household furnishings, Glover set sail in 1638 with a printing press valued at £20, 240 reams of paper worth £60, and a case of assorted type. Sadly, Mr. Glover did not survive the voyage. Glover’s widow, Elizabeth, with assistance from Mr. Daye, went on to set up the press at a house on Crooked Lane (now 15 Holyoke Street) in Cambridge. In a journal entry dated March 1639, John Winthrop, the governor for the colony, noted, “A printing house was begun at Cambridge by one Daye, at the charge of Mr. Glover, who died on seas hitherward.” Interestingly, Stephen Daye was a locksmith by trade. More is not known regarding why he was indentured and what position Mr. Glover originally intended him to have in the print shop. However, Mr. Daye’s son, Matthew, may have been apprenticed as a printer in London.When the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth in 1620, they brought with them a Book of Psalmes (Englished both in Prose and Metre) translated by Henry Ainsworth, a fellow Separatist, and published in 1612. One of the significant innovations of the Reformation had been the introduction of Psalm singing by the entire congregation. When the Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay Colony set sail across the Atlantic in 1629, they carried Sternhold and Hopkins Book of Psalmes. This popular psalter was frequently appended to editions of the Geneva Bible and the Book of Common Prayer and was essentially the authorized Psalm book for the Church of England.  To see how make this book:  Click Here